IDEA Public Charter School

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1027 45th St. NE, Washington, DC 20019 Phone: (202) 399-4750
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Michael A. Wilson Named IDEA’s CEO

“Mr. Wilson's longstanding commitment to education in the D.C. metropolitan area, particularly his demonstrated leadership and almost three decades of experience, focusing on urban education and public charter schools, make him an ideal choice for IDEA Public Charter School. The Board believes that his range of experience as a teacher, principal, college instructor, and nonprofit director give him the insight and knowledge to execute the school's strategic vision and mission of preparing scholars for post-secondary success," said Lakeshia Highsmith, vice chair of IDEA's Board of Trustees and leader of the selection committee.
 
Mr. Wilson comes to IDEA from the Reid Temple Christian Academy in Glenn Dale, Maryland, where he was the executive director. During his time in that role, he boosted the school’s reputation as a high-quality school emphasizing communications, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (CSTEM) by implementing multicultural education, including Global Embassy Mentors and International Ventures programs, and emphasizing world language education. He also implemented effective teaching training for all teachers and ensured academic readiness for students with a core curriculum that included reading, writing, math, social studies, and science.
 
He is a believer in lifelong learning, having most recently earned an Education Specialist (Ed.S.) degree in educational administration and supervision from George Washington University (GWU) in 2022. He received a post-master’s degree in education, educational administration, and supervision also from GWU in 2021. Mr. Wilson also has a Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree from Regent University. He is currently enrolled in a doctoral program in education at Liberty University.
 
Prior to his position at Reid, Mr. Wilson was the director of schools at Richard Wright Public Charter School for Journalism and Media Arts in Washington, D.C., where he was responsible for leading human capital, operations, budget, instruction, culture, and family engagement. He launched professional learning communities and strategies with effective coaching, problem of practice, and turnaround school culture resulting in an OSSE Star Framework Award. 
 
He has served in other leadership roles in both charter and public schools in the D.C. metropolitan area, including as principal and assistant principal. He was also the director of the Aspiring Principals Program at New Leaders, an educational leadership nonprofit organization. In this research-based position, he developed tools and programs to support principals in turning around failing schools. As a college instructor at the College of Southern Maryland, he taught speech, language arts, business and technical writing, and English arts.
 
“IDEA aligns with my personal and professional experience and goals to support students to achieve their greatest possible potential. As an educator, I have been honored to implement strategic programs and initiatives that enabled student learning and accomplishment. I’m looking forward to taking IDEA to its next level of growth by working to create and implement new partnerships and programs, grow its financial capabilities, and support its staff and faculty in their work,” Mr. Wilson said. Above all, he looks forward to working with scholars and their parents so that they can realize their educational goals. He believes, he noted, “in a great education for all students through effective teaching and outstanding instructional leadership.” 
 
Mr. Wilson is a D.C. native and currently resides with his wife, a public charter school teacher, and their two daughters in Maryland. 
 
“The Board appreciates the efforts of IDEA's scholars, families, staff, and faculty in this leadership search process,” said Ms. Highsmith. “We are excited about Mr. Wilson taking IDEA into its next stage as a provider of rigorous, well-rounded education in the Deanwood community.”
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